Deadline for Grading Mode Selection Extended

This is a repost of the email sent to students by the Registrar on September 3rd.

Dear Students,

Please be informed for this semester the faculty have voted to extend the deadline for selecting the grading mode of a class that is already offered for student-option (A-F or Cr/U).  The new deadline is November 24, which is also the last day to withdraw from classes.

Sincerely,

Anna C. G. van der Burg, University Registrar

 

 

More Seats Available in CSPL/CGST 480

Still need a class this semester?

CSPL/CGST480 ENGAGED PROJECTS is a new 1-credit course in which students study a topic of their choice and produce a final project for a public audience. EPs deepen student learning and self-reflection, ease the undeniable challenges of online learning, and introduce students to their own agency and positionality in society.

Interested students should contact the instructor (Makaela Kingsley, mjkingsley@wesleyan.edu), submit a proposal on Handshake (instructions at https://www.wesleyan.edu/patricelli/engaged-projects.html), and submit an enrollment request in WesPortal.

 

Two New Online Courses – Fall 2020

Civil Rights Litigation Since 1978: A Practitioner’s Perspective

CSPL 217        Times: Th 6:00-9PM, Location: ONLINE

This course will examine major themes in modern civil rights litigation in the United States between 1978 and 2020.  The course will review major cases challenging police misconduct, school and housing segregation, including exclusionary land use policies, sexual harassment and bullying as well as cases supporting voting and gay rights. Students will be asked to present argument before their peers regarding the issues raised in and by these cases and will also be presented with imaginary fact patterns and asked to discern the critical legal issues raised and apply both the settled law and aspirational law as we develop it through Socratic method. In addition, students will select an area of civil rights litigation and writing about its evolution.

Understanding the 2020 Presidential Election

CSPL399    Times: M.W. 1:20-2:40PM, Location: ONLINE

In understanding the 2020 Presidential Election, students will learn how to read skeptically the political press and how to write critically about presidential campaign politics. Along the way, the course will touch on electoral history, political and social thought, public policy, media criticism, and much more. Students will read past examples of thought-provoking and influential commentary. They will read current coverage in the legacy press of the 2020 presidential election and come to class prepared to discuss the most important stories and issues of the week. Students will have the opportunity to learn about electoral politics and political writing alongside a veteran journalist. Students who have experience working for political campaigns will have a chance to share their knowledge and help the class incorporate their experience in a larger historical framework. They will have a chance to see their work published in the Editorial Board, the lecturer’s daily politics newsletter. Students will attempt to do what political writers do in real-time: explain what’s happening from a unique, particular, and informed point of view for the benefit of like-minded citizens seeking to achieve the ideal of self-government. In the end, the hope is that students see that campaign politics is simpler and more complex than it appears, but that neither is obvious without study, focus, and understanding.

Adding Your Thesis Tutorial During Drop/Add – Fall 2020

Tutorial forms are available electronically in the Drop/Add portion of WesMaps. Click on the “Tutorials” link, below the “Courses Offered” link. Tutorials are student initiated and are approved through a workflow process in our campus system.

The screenshot below gives an example of how tutorials should populate on WesMaps.

Note: you should not submit any paper forms for tutorials during the drop/add period.

Image of the Tutorial Option in WesMaps

Courses for the African Studies for the Minor

I would be grateful if you would advertise the African Studies course listings to any students interested in the minor or just want to explore a class focusing on the continent.
This fall’s courses that count toward the minor are:

ANTH311: Migration and Movement in/between Muslim Worlds

DANC260: West African Dance I

DANC360: West African Dance II

ECON366: The Economics of Developing Countries

*ENGL221: The African Novel I: Nervous Conditions* (Has more than 5 open seats as of 8/13/20)

MUSC445: West African Music and Culture–Beginners

MUSC446: West African Music and Culture–Intermediate

*Please note the ANTH class counts for the minor, but the registrar has not yet updated it on WesMaps*

For students who are interested in the minor, we will be offering the core course HIST212: Modern Africa in the spring.

Very best wishes,
Laura Ann
Laura Ann Twagira

Associate Professor
Department of History
Wesleyan University
238 Church Street
Middletown, CT 06459-0002

CSPL/CGST 480 Engaged Projects Info Sessions for Students – 8/3 – 8/12

CSPL/CGST480 ENGAGED PROJECTS is a new 1-credit course in which students study a topic of their choice and produce a final project for a public audience. EPs respond to this critical moment in history by empowering students to connect their academic pursuits to what is happening in the world around them. They deepen student learning and self-reflection, ease the undeniable challenges of online learning, and introduce students to their own agency and positionality in society. Full details are at https://www.wesleyan.edu/patricelli/engaged-projects.html.

There are three information sessions for students coming up:

August 3, 12-1PM Eastern Time, https://wesleyan.zoom.us/j/93776440979

August 6, 9-10AM Eastern Time, https://wesleyan.zoom.us/j/93776440979

August 12, 6-7PM Eastern Time, https://wesleyan.zoom.us/j/93776440979

Questions? Contact Makaela Kingsley at mjkingsley@wesleyan.edu or by appointment at http://calendly.com/mjkingsley.

Definitions of Course Formats/Instruction Modes for Fall 2020

Definitions of Instruction Modes:

In-person only = Intend to hold the class in-person on campus until Thanksgiving, remotely after Thanksgiving, and cannot accept any online students who would participate remotely.

In-person with remote students = Intend to hold the class in-person on campus until Thanksgiving, remotely after Thanksgiving, and will accept students who are unable to participate in-person and need to participate remotely.

Online only = Intend to hold the course online for the entire semester.

Hybrid in-person only = Intend to offer a course that will include some in-person sessions and some sessions online until Thanksgiving, fully online after Thanksgiving, and cannot accept any students who would not be able to participate in the in-person sessions.

Hybrid with remote students = Intend to offer a course that will include some in-person sessions and some sessions online until Thanksgiving, fully online after Thanksgiving, and will accept students who are unable to participate in-person and need to participate in all sessions remotely.

You may access this listing from the Office of the Registrar here.

Reactivating Campus in Fall – A Message from President Michael Roth

President Roth sent the following message to the campus community on July 8, 2020. I have posted it on our class blog for your convenience.

Wishing you good health,

Dean Leathers

Dear friends,

As promised in my June message, I am writing now with more specificity concerning our plans to reactivate campus in late August. Since our first priority is the health and safety of our community members, these plans may have to be adjusted in response to changing public health conditions. Whatever these challenging conditions may be, we intend to provide an excellent educational experience (on campus or remotely).

We have developed a robust set of resources on our website about our campus reactivation, including information on instruction and campus life, health and safety, and returning to work on campus. Here are some highlights:

We will begin fall classes on August 31 (one week earlier than initially scheduled), with the possibility of finishing the semester online after Thanksgiving (there will be no traditional fall break). Students will be asked to avoid large gatherings in the weeks before coming to campus and to take increasing precautions, in addition to wearing masks and social distancing. Students who are able to get tested will be encouraged to determine that they are negative for Covid-19 within 48 hours of traveling to campus. Everyone on campus will be tested shortly after arrival, and there will be frequent testing on a regular basis thereafter. Those on campus who test positive for Covid-19 will be provided with supportive isolation until they are no longer contagious. Students who test positive will be able to continue their coursework remotely.

Faculty have been given the choice as to whether they will teach their classes in person, remotely, or in some combination. It is likely that many students will have a portion of their instruction online, whether they return to campus or not. While some staff members will continue to work remotely, there will be a presence of staff on campus.  Apart from the commuting of employees (who will be tested for the virus), we expect little travel to campus.  There will be no program of intercollegiate sports or club sports, but we do plan to have safe athletic training on campus.

Despite the economic challenges we are all contending with, Wesleyan remains firmly committed to both enrolling a socio-economically diverse student body and meeting the full demonstrated need of our financial aid students. Given new regulations from Washington, Wesleyan is particularly concerned about our international students, and we are committed to doing all we can to ensure that they can continue to make academic progress in Fall 2020.

Please consult the website for detailed information most relevant to your own circumstances, and feel free to reach out to the appropriate department with your questions. We will continually update this site with more information as it becomes available. We will send out another community message in August, or sooner depending on the public health trajectory. Obviously, we are very concerned about the recent surge in cases in the South and West and are monitoring the situation closely. Our plans may have to change.

We believe in the value of an on-campus education, and the basic steps we need to take are clear. The simple act of wearing a mask consistently reduces the likelihood of transmission. Masks combined with rigorous testing, tracing and supportive isolation will make our campus safer. I look forward to a fall semester in which we take good care of one another and continue to excel in learning together.

Sincerely,

Michael S. Roth

President