The Proof is in the Pudding: Putin’s Pivot to Asia with Dr. David Abramson ’87 — Today, 4:30 p.m.

The Proof is in the Pudding: Putin’s Pivot to Asia

Monday March 26, 4.30 pm, PAC 001

Dr. David Abramson, Senior Analyst in the Office of Analysis for Russia and Eurasia at the U.S. Department of State. will discuss the drivers of Russia’s outreach in Asia and its prospects for success.

Putin initiated his pivot to Asia policy even before the West began imposing sanctions on Russia in response to its annexation of Crimea and invasion of eastern Ukraine in 2014.  Putin’s reaction to the U.S. and European-led condemnation was to double down and demonstrate that Russia had partners other than the West and would not remain isolated.  Consequently, Moscow has been reaching out actively to both familiar and nontraditional partners in Asia, but has a long way to go in building trust and following through on its commitments beyond the optics of trying to reestablish itself as a global power.

Dr. David Abramson (Wesleyan Class of 1987, Russian Language and Literature) is senior analyst covering Russia’s relations with Asia for the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Intelligence and Research, Office of Analysis for Russia and Eurasia.  He previously worked for many years as a Central Asia analyst, focusing primarily on Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, and Islamic trends in Eurasia.

During 2001-2005, Dr. Abramson spent four years in the Department’s Office of International Religious Freedom, monitoring and promoting religious freedom in the Middle East as an element of U.S. foreign policy, advising on outreach to the Muslim world, and engaging with Muslim-American communities.

Dr. Abramson also teaches courses on Central Asia at Georgetown University and has published on Islam, national identity, and foreign assistance in Central Asia, and on anthropologists working on national security.  He received his doctorate in Cultural Anthropology from Indiana University where he specialized in community and conflict in post-Soviet Uzbekistan.

 

REES Lecture: “Derelict Futures: Soviet Industrial Space in Contemporary Russian Culture” by Daria Exerova — 12/5, 11:50 a.m.

Please join us for a lecture by Daria Ezerova,

“Derelict Futures: Soviet Industrial Space in Contemporary Russian Culture.”

Tuesday Dec. 5, 11:50-1:00, 112 Boger Hall

Daria Ezerova is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Yale University. Her dissertation is titled “Derelict Futures: The Spaces of Socialism in Contemporary Russian Literature and Film.” Her research focuses on contemporary Russian culture and the extent to which it demonstrates the continuity of Soviet models of representation. She considers examples from literature, drama, and film from the early 1990s to the mid-2000s and compares them with the landmarks of Soviet culture. The primary focus of her dissertation is the representation of space. Through exploring the interrelationship between space and time in the periods of radical political transition, she argues that after the fall of the USSR capitalism substituted itself for Soviet Marxism as the tutelary spirit that invested space with a sense of the future, and Russian culture briefly renewed its belief in progress. But this optimism proved to be short-lived: in the Putin era, a new sense of space emerged in the literary and cinematic counter-culture that that was marked by the acute absence of any scenario suggesting temporal progress.

 

 

Africa Week Events — Nov. 28-Dec. 2

African Students Association’s Africa Week!
Tomorrow, Tuesday, November 28th, 2017 will kick off our first event with a film screening of Stories of Our Lives, which is a Kenyan film that was released in 2014 and created by The Nest Collective, a Nairobi-based arts collective. The film is an anthology of five short films dramatizing true stories of LGBT lives in Kenya. The screening will take place tomorrow in the Ring Family Performing Arts Hall at 7 pm We look forward to seeing you!

International Education Week Activities November 13-17

Dear Wesleyan students,

November 13-17 marks this year’s International Education Week, an initiative that is cosponsored by the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Department of Education in order to highlight the importance of global learning on our university campuses.

The Fries Center for Global Studies staff has put together a rich agenda of week-long activities in recognition of this initiative, activities that are intended to be informative, engaging and fun! Check out what’s available by clicking on the image below.  Most importantly, mark your calendars and come celebrate with us in Fisk 201 to meet the Wes in the World Photo Contestants!

We look forward to seeing you there!  Sincerely, The FCGS Staff

Danza Organica — today

DANZA ORGÁNICA: Marsha Parrilla

TALK and PARTICIPATORY DISCUSSION

Friday, November 3, 1:40PM

Schonberg Studio, 247 Pine Street

Puerto Rico was hit by the worst hurricane in over a century. There is currently a humanitarian crisis. Hurricane María left the entire island without electricity, water, and has taken the homes of thousands of Puerto Ricans. The country is completely devastated. The ecological damage is tremendous, and there is a public health crisis.

Currently:

  • there is no electricity or tap water
  • water is contaminated in the entire island (there is a strong need for water filters)
  • there are outbreaks of: leptospirosis, conjunctivitis, and gastrointestinal disorders
  • around 7,000 additional people are living in shelters post Maria

Danza Orgánica (DO), directed by Marsha Parrilla, is a dance theater company that uses movement to generate awareness around social justice concerns. It’s newest work, MELAZA explores de colonial relationship between Puerto Rico and the United States of America. It has also served as a platform to generate awareness around Hurricane Maria, and raise funds towards grassroots organizations.

Discussion: “The Political Crisis in Catalonia” –10/10 at noon

Tuesday October 10, 2017

12:00-1:00 pm, Fisk 201
Pizza will be served

The Catalonian drive for independence has met with fierce resistance from the Spanish government in Madrid. Does Catalonia deserve independence? What are the ways that the political standoff can be resolved? These issues will be discussed by Antonio Gonzalez (Romance Languages) and Peter Rutland (Government).

Sponsored by the Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life and the Fries Center for Global Studies

International Education Posters — Submission Deadline: 10/15

The Fries Center for Global Studies (FCGS) is now accepting proposals for posters during International Education Week (November 13 – 17). Posters will be presented during lunch on Tuesday, November 14.

We invite students to submit a proposal to share their international experience — including experiences in the United States — to showcase research, internships, academic study, language acquisition, artistic endeavors, and independent work that has an international component. We hope this experience will allow students to connect with one another, to share their knowledge and experience and to grow personally, academically, and professionally through this experience.

The value of sharing what you know through a poster session can have a far-reaching impact. Because of the collaborative nature of this sessions and International Education Week, presenters often find that through the process of sharing their expertise they often gain new insights themselves. Being a presenter is also an excellent way to build your professional résumé and speaker profile. We hope you will consider participating and help fulfill our mission to support students in expanding international opportunities and experiences by sharing what you know with others.

TO SUBMIT PROPOSAL, PLEASE CLICK HERE

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2017 AT 11:59 PM EST.