New Course: FIST232/MDST232: Obscure Enigma of Desire — MW 10:50 a.m.-12:10 p.m.

FIST232/MDST232   Obscure Enigma of Desire, MW 10:50AM-12:10PM; FISK210, Professor Jeff Rider

This course is an introduction to the study of the ways we create meanings when we read texts. It will focus on several deliberately obscure literary texts from twelfth-century France and will examine them in the light of the classical and medieval concepts of enigma, the marvelous (wonderful), fabula, and allegory as well as some modern theoretical works about how we understand narratives. We will seek to understand why deliberate obscurity is an important part of literature and how medieval authors created narratives that seem particularly meaningful precisely because they are obscure. We will consider why we feel these texts have meaning and the ways in which we make them meaningful to us.

This course will be co-taught in parallel with a course (in English) on the same subject offered at the Charles University in Prague by Professor Lucie Dolezalova. About half of the classes will be conducted together with the class in Prague through teleconferencing and Professor Dolezalova will teach one week of the course at Wesleyan and meet with students while she is here.

Readings:

Marie de France, Lais; Chrétien de Troyes, The Knight of the Cart (Lancelot) and The Story of the Grail; The Quest for the Holy Grail; Aristotle, Poetics (excerpts); Cicero, On the Orator and On Invention (excerpts); Rhetorica ad Herennium (excerpts); Quintillian, The Oratorical Education (excerpts); Aulus Gellius, Attic Nights(excerpts); Augustine, On Christian Doctrine, On the Trinity, Questions Concerning the Heptateuch, and Expositions of the Psalms (excerpts); Isidore of Seville, Etymologies (excerpts); Aldhelm of Malmesbury, Enigmas (excerpts); Abelard, Christian Theology (excerpts); William of Conches, Commentaries on Boethius’s “Consolation of Philosophy” (excerpts); Hugh of Saint-Victor, On the Three Days, On Meditation, and Didascalicon (excerpts); Thomas Aquinas, Summa Contra Gentiles  and Summa Theologica (excerpts); Eleanor Cook, Enigmas and Riddles in Literature (excerpts); Rita Copeland and Stephen Melville, “Allegory and Allegoresis, Rhetoric and Hermeneutics”; Joseph Dane, “Integumentum as Interpretation”; Ferdinand de Saussure, Course in General Linguistics (excerpts); Peter Dronke, Fabula: Explorations into the Uses of Myth in Medieval Platonism (excerpts); Louis Mink, “History and Fiction as Modes of Comprehension”; Karl F. Morrison, “Hermeneutics and Enigma: Bernard of Clairvaux’s De consideratione”; Paul Ricoeur, “Metaphor and Hermeneutics,” “The Hermeneutical Function of Distanciation,” “What is a Text?” and “Appropriation”; Winthrop Wetherbee, Platonism and Poetry in the Twelfth Century (excerpts); Jan Ziolkowski, “Theories of Obscurity in the Latin Tradition”

New Course: ENGL373/MDST373: From Courtly Love to Cannibalism: Medival Romances MW 2:50-4 p.m.

English 373:  From Courtly Love to Cannibalism: Medieval Romances

MW 2:50-4 p.m., Professor Ruth Nisse

Romance is the narrative form of medieval sexualities and courtly love, but it also gives literary shape to social worlds in which a queer protagonist loses gender, skin color changes with religion, and a dog might be the hero of a tale. We will begin with texts that date from the Romance’s origins in 12th-century France and continue with the form’s development up to the well-known Middle English texts of the 14th century, including Sir Gawain and the Green Knight set at King Arthur’s court. Some of the topics we will consider are Romance’s engagement with the religious and ethnic conflicts of the Crusades, theories of good and bad government, and of course, Christian mysticism and the Holy Grail.

Readings:

Béroul, Romance of Tristan Chretien de Troyes, Arthurian Romances Marie de France, Lais Aucassin and Nicolette The Quest of the Holy Grail Romance of Silence Song of Roland Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Sir Orfeo (Online) The King of Tars (Online) Richard Coer de Lyon (Online)

 

Social Entreneurship Seed Grants — Apps due 1/28; help with apps 12/11-13

Do you want to make a difference but just need the funding to do it?

The Patricelli Center is offering three $5,000 Seed Grants, a $10,000 Projects for Peace Grant and several $4,000 Summer Experience Grants. These grants are open to anyone with an idea for a social venture or social impact project that they want to launch or grow. Applications due 1/28!

If you would like to learn more or get help on your application, stop by Drop-In hours 12/11-12/13 from 12:00-1:00 pm in Allbritton 022.

For more info visit the Patricelli Center or email engage@wesleyan.edu.

CFH Lecture: “Waiting in Necropolitical Times” — Prof. Victoria Pitts-Taylor Today! Dec. 4 at 6 p.m.

MONDAY NIGHT LECTURE SERIES | RETHINKING NECROPOLITICS

Waiting in Necropolitical Times

Victoria Pitts-Taylor • Wesleyan University

December 4 @ 6 P.M. | Daniel Family Commons

Waiting is a key mode of experiencing the effects of power; in some instances, it may express what Lauren Berlant calls ‘slow death’. Waiting is a common aspect of medicalized gender transition – trans people seeking hormones or surgery are often made to wait for years. This talk explores temporal dimensions of medicalized gender transition – in particular, the waiting lists, waiting periods, setbacks, refusals, and structural delays imposed on trans patients. Can the attachment constituted in long-term waiting be sustaining, or is it a threat to one’s well being? How is waiting managed, accepted, and contested by people who are subjected to it? These questions take on a necropolitical cast in the context of high rates of suicide and violence against trans people. This discussion is part of a broader study that uses critical social theories and an eclectic archive to address waiting as relation between time, power, and social being. It argues that through regimens of waiting, biopower can enfold people into life-making practices while also rendering them neglected and disposable.

Center for the Humanities · 95 Pearl Street , Middletown, CT 06459
www.wesleyan.edu/humanities

C. Riley Snorton–“Black on Both Sides: A Racial History of Trans Identity” — Dec. 5 at 4:30 p.m.

C. Riley Snorton

“Black on Both Sides: A Racial History of Trans Identity”

Tuesday,December 5, 2017 4:30 PM in Russell House

In Black on Both Sides, C. Riley Snorton identifies multiple intersections between blackness and transness from the mid-nineteenth century to present-day anti-black and anti-trans legislation and violence. Snorton is associate professor of Africana studies and feminist, gender, and sexuality studies at Cornell University, and the author of Nobody Is Supposed to Know: Black Sexuality on the Down Low (Minnesota, 2014).

REES Lecture: “Derelict Futures: Soviet Industrial Space in Contemporary Russian Culture” by Daria Exerova — 12/5, 11:50 a.m.

Please join us for a lecture by Daria Ezerova,

“Derelict Futures: Soviet Industrial Space in Contemporary Russian Culture.”

Tuesday Dec. 5, 11:50-1:00, 112 Boger Hall

Daria Ezerova is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Yale University. Her dissertation is titled “Derelict Futures: The Spaces of Socialism in Contemporary Russian Literature and Film.” Her research focuses on contemporary Russian culture and the extent to which it demonstrates the continuity of Soviet models of representation. She considers examples from literature, drama, and film from the early 1990s to the mid-2000s and compares them with the landmarks of Soviet culture. The primary focus of her dissertation is the representation of space. Through exploring the interrelationship between space and time in the periods of radical political transition, she argues that after the fall of the USSR capitalism substituted itself for Soviet Marxism as the tutelary spirit that invested space with a sense of the future, and Russian culture briefly renewed its belief in progress. But this optimism proved to be short-lived: in the Putin era, a new sense of space emerged in the literary and cinematic counter-culture that that was marked by the acute absence of any scenario suggesting temporal progress.

 

 

More Flu Shots Available

Dear Wes Students,

If you missed the campus-wide flu clinics last month and still interested in receiving a flu shot, please contact the Health Center for an appointment.  We have a limited amount of doses available for students only.  To make an appointment or for more information, please call 860.685.2470.

CSS Info Session — 12/7 at noon

An Invitation from the Tutors and Students in the College of Social Studies

 

The current CSS Tutors and Students invite you to a CSS Info Session on Thursday, December 7th, from 12:00 noon – 1:00 p.m., in the CSS Lounge, PAC 406.  Several of the CSS Tutors and the CSS Students will speak.  This Info Session will offer you an opportunity to ask questions about the CSS.

Refreshments will be served.

Please note:

  • Applications for the CSS will be available online in the Spring Semester.
  • Interviews with CSS Tutors and Students will be held before Spring Break.
  • Check here for more information about the CSS: http://wesleyan.edu/css.

 

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Africa Week Events — Nov. 28-Dec. 2

African Students Association’s Africa Week!
Tomorrow, Tuesday, November 28th, 2017 will kick off our first event with a film screening of Stories of Our Lives, which is a Kenyan film that was released in 2014 and created by The Nest Collective, a Nairobi-based arts collective. The film is an anthology of five short films dramatizing true stories of LGBT lives in Kenya. The screening will take place tomorrow in the Ring Family Performing Arts Hall at 7 pm We look forward to seeing you!

Withdrawal Deadline: Fri., Dec. 1 at 5 p.m.

Just a reminder that the last day to withdraw from full-semester and second-quarter classes for the Fall 2017 semester is Friday, December 1.  Completed forms are due in the Registrar’s Office by 5:00 p.m. and must include the following signatures: instructor, faculty advisor, and class dean.

If you are thinking about withdrawing from a course:

  • Do be very clear about your standing in each of your courses.
  • Do use this time to talk to your professors, your advisor, and your class dean about your concerns.
  • Do make sure you are taking advantage of all the resources available to you.
  • Do get the signatures of your instructor and advisor on your drop/add form.
  • Do keep in mind that a “W” is a neutral mark.

If you’d like to talk with the your class dean about whether to withdraw from a course, go to drop-in hours or give the office a call to set up a time to meet.